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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 133 (some duplicates have been removed)
that the assad regime will fall by next summer. the u.s. institute posted the activists who are part of a group called the day after project. they presented a transition plan for syria which they say it started being used by the opposition areas no longer under assad's control. this is just under two hours. >> good morning ladies and gentlemen. i am jim marshall the new president of the institute of peace which i'm delighted to tell you and i'm also very pleased that everyone is here today for a very important, to hear about a very important projects sponsored by the institute of peace. my job principally is to introduce steve heideman. steve stevens or senior advisor for middle east initiatives. he has taught at columbia. he is extensively published, has also directed the center for democracy and civil studies and civil society at georgetown university. he is a terrific asset to the institute. this project is one that is driven by syria with assistance, technical assistance and other kinds of assistance from the institute and sister institution in germany. it is very important that these kinds
artillery fighting between turkey and syria. yesterday syrian activists predict that the assad regime will fall. this was held by the u.s. institute of peace, and it is close to two hours. >> good morning. in jim marshall, the new president of the institute of peace, which i am delighted to tell you, and i am pleased everyone is here for an import -- to hear about and the port project that has been sponsored by the institute for peace. my job is to introduce steve heideman. he has directed the center for democracy and civil studies -- civil society at georgetown. he -- he is a terrific asset for the institute. this project is driven by syrians, with technical assistance and other kinds of assistance from the institute and a sister institute in germany. it is important these efforts are driven by local populations, things that are handed down from the united states did not work all that well. we are pleased that you are here. i hope you have lots of questions, and if i can turn this over to you -- >> thank you para much, and let me add my welcome to you. we are delighted to see you her
at the moment in the middle east. there is a belief that a lot of the assad military are using weapons they've got from iran. is that true? and how long will you continue to support assad given the appalling conditions, the humanitarian catastrophe that we are all watching? at what point do you, the president of iran, say enough of this violence? >> translator: i do believe that we must all say enough of this violence right now. six months ago, i said enough of this violence. our opinion, vis-a-vis the issue of syria and other nations, is completely clear. we do believe that freedom, the right to choose, the right to vote, respect and justice is the fundamental right of all people. all people must obtain these rights. no one has the right to restrict a people and nation, but we believe as a friend of nations, we must help the nations around the world to obtain these rights through peaceful paths, through peaceful actions, and we have worked hard. i am now hard at work to organize a contact group in order to bring the two sides into a point of national agreement. >> mr. president, do you con
is a really difficult proposition. and it's a complex to society. when mr. assad goes as i believe eventually he will, what takes its place. how do we do that? these are complicated things. i don't know enough about-- when every one of these things is going on, gi out of my way not to talk to hillary about it so i don't have any information i shouldn't have so i don't inadvertently say something to you that i shouldn't say. so i don't know what their options are. but i think that if we have some nonlethal options that we could use to support the syrian opposition, i presume we would be doing it. and i wouldn't be surprised if we are. i think most people believe that assad is going to have to go. it's sooner or later he will. and their concern about whether-- whatever arrangements that succeeds him can preserve a secular state can preserve a state which gives women a commendable amount of opportunities when compared with the competition in the region, you know, and but is less oppressive, less repressive and less subject to the siren song of the iranians and hezbollah and other forces that pro
becomes, can bashar al-assad handle fighting from in his country the rebels as well as outside of his country from turkey? that could be enough to crush the regime? >>guest: there is is no doubt bashar al-assad wants to keep turkey out of this. that is why we see not just syria apologizing but the russians who are the main diplomatic protector coming in and trying to contain this situation. what you see from the west, also, frankly, is a desire to contain the actual spillover here, the fighting here, and move this into the united nations security council to try to take advantage of this, to spur action in the council. >>trace: you use the word "contain" and that brings the next question. are you concerned this could become a regional war and spread in what really is a very unsettled part of world? >>guest: well, it is already more regionalized than people realize. you have this strike in turkey. it is not the first strike in turkey. we have seen strikes in lebanon. there have been a flow of refugees? jordan and turkey. we have iranian forces and ed in the fighting. as time goes on we
assad's tanks and helicopters and fighter jets. >> that takes some talking. the former nato sprum allied commander is supporting the campaign and to the right is kristen silverberg, am bass tor to the union. before today, mitt romney had not specifically called for arming the rebels and this country is really not too keen on it and nor are they too opposed, it seems. if you look at it, 48% favor doing so. 47% oppose doing so, but this is new from mitt romney. but how are we supposed to know who the good guys are, who the bad guys are and is he suggesting for a moment that america send the guns? >> no, what governor romney outline ed today was a plan to work with the region, turkey, the saudis, to make sure they have a weapons they need. the two things we hear, first from the opposition groups themselves, that they don't have the weapons they need to overthrow assad and second from our partners in the region, that they feel constrained by u.s. policy from doing things to support the rebels. and that's really a disaster for us. one because we're allowing a slaughter to continue. 30,000 civ
activist today predicted that the assad regime will fall by next summer. the u.s. institute of peace hosted the activist who were part of a group called the day after project. they presented a transition plan for syria which they say is being used by the opposition in areas no longer under assad's control. it's under two hours. [inaudible conversations] >> good morning, ladies and gentlemen. i'm jim marshall the new president of the substitute of peace. i'm delighted to tell you. and i'm also pleased that everyone is here today for a very important -- to hear about a important project that has been sponsored. my job is to introduce steven heydemann. steve is the senior adviser for middle east initiative. he taught at colombia. he is published and directed if the senator for democracy and civil society at georgetown university. steve is terrific asset to the institute. the project is one that it driven by syrians. with assistance technical assistance and other kinds of assistance from the institute in a sister constitution in germany. it's very important that these kinds of efforts be driven
ambassador. it's working with the arab league to identify people to help force assad out of power a year after president obama said, we want assad out of power. he has substantive things to talk about on the debate stage when they debate foreign policy in two weeks and that ad is now irrelevant. >> don't you think this is a case of him saying, i'll do the things the president is trying to do but do them more effectively? >> there's a fair case to make and there's an opening for that. >> i agree. i'm not saying that's a bad thing. >> there's an opening the size of a pin drop. he didn't lay out his strategy for peace in israel. on iran, the best he could come up with was, i'm going to get tougher on iran because i'm going to have tougher sanctions. >> when barack obama came to office, he said, i'm not george w. bush, so therefore, i can negotiate with iran. >> he said he would open up all doors but he wasn't going to give you a seat at the table unless you wanted to come and talk peace. >> we have unsolicited advice on the other side of the break including helpful hints for donald trump. s
going from both sides. as president bashar al-assad syrian troops launched another attack on the rebels in the northern part of his country. there is a heavy turkish military presence this. clearly, the artillery has been given the grown light to fired. it is a dangerous dynamic and we could have a regional war. turkey is part of nato, so turkey could invoke the collective defense clause of that treaty and it would draw on the united states and other western allies to recollect and defend turkey if it gets into a war with syria. the other dynamic, the syrian rebels need help. it could be a point that syrian rebels launch shells at turkey to try and start a war that obviously they would get a lost help from going up against the common enemy, president bashar al-assad. >>trace: and the syrian rebel, how are they doing? >>guest: they have not been doing great but this week they did get some good news in an unusual victory. they took over a syrian air defense space which means they got the missiles inside that base, and if they can figure out how to use the missiles against president bashar
, and children have been massacred by the assad regime over the past 20 months. violent extremists are flowing into the fight. our ally turkey has been attacked. the conflict threatens stability in the region. america can take pride in the blows that our military and intelligence professionals have inflicted on al qaeda, pakistan, afghanistan, including the killing of osama bin laden. these are real achievements one at a high cost. al qaeda remains a strong force, however, in yemen and somalia, libya, other parts of north africa, iraq, and now in syria, and other extremists have been ground across the region. drones and modern instruments of war are important tools in our fight, but are no substitute for national security strategy for the middle east. the president is fond of saying that the tide of war is receding. i want to believe him as much as anyone se. but when we look at the middle east today, with iran closer than ever to nuclear weapons capability, with the conflict in syria threatening to destabilize the region, and with a violent extremists on the march, and with an american ambass
of the opposition who share our values and ensure they obtain the arms they need to defeat assad's tanks, helicopters and fighter jets. nbc's first read pointing out that reports of cia doing something covertly like this in syria. so something going on as we speak. the u.s. government did this with libya. basically arming the opposition. and you know, your men ri's men ri is only my friend for so long. is that a wise approach? >> no. i have spent time on this issue. there's no doubt providing nonlethal communication support is extraordinary important and secretary clinton announced massive amount of humanitarian assistance and ku dos to the administration for doing that. the real problem here is that there's this struggle within the romney campaign itself over syria between neo-conservatives to militarily intervene and those who actually are more reticent and the problem is that mr. romney flip flops between one group and the other and can't quite decide which one is more important. the bottom line, however, for purposes of american interest in the middle east, arming a rag tag group of
? >> there is a whole category of rebels, the prchz to a ba shall al-assad's regime and there are some more democrat cli inclined shall we say to presumably would want to have a better relationship with the united states with the west and other friendly countries in the middle east, whether saudi arabia or qatar or some of the other countries actively involved in what's going on in syria a. the great concern the obama administration has had and the reason why the u.s. has not sought to arm the rebels is because some of those rebels may be totally opposed to the united states, maybe closer to al qaeda, for example, than to the united states, so once you start arming rebels in a major way, you're not sure where those weapons are going to wind up, and that's been the big concern of the obama administration right now. how do you make sure that the weapons you provide rebels are really going to the good guys as it were as opposed to the potential bad guys and that's not an easy question to answer. >> never. in fact, we have countless examples where this has gone awry. hold the thought for a moment. if you co
countries to help arm the rebels to defeat president bashar assad. >> and then ensure that they obtain the arms they need to defeat assad's tanks and helicopters and fighter jets. >> reporter: romney's aide saying romney is not suggesting the u.s. arm the rebels directly. president obama has opposed providing weapons to the rebels partly out of concern that those weapons could wind up in the hands of terrorists. on iran mitt romney earlier this year saying this. >> if we re-elect barack obama, iran will have a nuclear weapon. >> reporter: but today was unclear what exactly romney would do that would be different. the obama administration imposing tough sanctions already. >> i will not hesitate to impose new sanctions on iran and will tighten the sanctions we currently have. >> reporter: the obama campaign asking just what would those new sanctions be, and on libya after the attack in benghazi that killed four americans including ambassador chris stevens, blistering words today from romeny for the obama administration. >> this latest assault can't be blamed on a reprehensible video insu
to the syrian's request for freedom and he would do more to help the opposition against bashar al- assad. >> i'll work with our partners to identify and organize members of the opposition who share our whoes and then ensure that they obtain the arms they need to defeat assad's tanks and helicopters and fighter jets. >> reporter: romney also delivered his harshest assessment yet of the ministstration's evolving response to the attacks in libya. assauls latest assault can't be blamed on a reprehensible video insulting islam-- despite the heministration's attempts to convince us of that for so long. no, as the administration has finally conceded, these attacks erat the deliberate work of terrorists. they use violence to impose violr dark ideology and others. >> reporter: romney has been critical of the way the eyesident has handled libya, he iticalted humanitarian aid when ibe president advocated that but esidenhe president last year called for qaddafi's ouster, scott, romney accused him of omneng ad hoc determinations and saying he didn't have a long- term strategy. >> pelley: as you might imagi
with the overall win forethier for this season. >> he was part of syrian president assad's brutal regime and now he's talking to cnn. >> how did assad's behavior change? >> translator: he seemed worried all day long. we rarely saw him smiling. he stared out the windows and was always anxious and tense. >> the tearian press officer give as firsthand account of what is happening inside the government. "homemade" yummy, scrumptious bars. hmm? i just wanted you to eat more fiber. chewy, oatie, gooeyness... and fraudulence. i'm in deep, babe. you certainly are. [ male announcer ] fiber one. i'm in deep, babe. you certainly are. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. if we want to improve our schools... ...what should we invest in? maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent research shows... ...nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. side by s
baldwin. the news is now. >>> a man close to bashar al assad's regime defects. and speaks to cnn. >> translator: he seemed worried all day long. we rarely saw him smiling. >>> plus, a consulate's attacked, an ambassador is killed, and this lawmaker wants answers. jason chaffetz joins me live, fresh off his trip to libya. >>> and the magic johnson tells me about an in-home test that could save your life. jack, you're a little boring. boring. boring. [ jack ] after lauren broke up with me, i went to the citi private pass page and decided to be...not boring. that's how i met marilyn... giada... really good. yes! [ jack ] ...and alicia. ♪ this girl is on fire [ male announcer ] use any citi card to get the benefits of private pass. more concerts, more events, more experiences. [ jack ] hey, who's boring now? [ male announcer ] get more access with the citi card. [ crowd cheering, mouse clicks ] ♪ playing a lone hand ♪ my life begins today ♪ ♪ fly by night away from here ♪ ♪ change my life again ♪ ♪ fly by night, goodbye my dear ♪ ♪ my ship isn't coming ♪ and i
inside their country to a conflict with turkey. jon: bashar al-assad's forces have enough of a problem just containing, just battling their own population, the rebel fighters within syria. if they have to take on a force from outside, namely turkey, are they going to be able to handle that? >> no, they could not. quite frankly, i don't think they can handle the rebels if we gave them the weapons that they desire and some of the information that they desperately need, not even to speak of a no-fly zone, if we just armed them properly i think the syrian military would have significant problems with the rebels as we've already seen. jon: but then you wind up with the question of who fills the vacuum. if bashar al-assad were to fall who fills the vacuum, and can we be certain that the rebels are going to wind up being our friends? >> well, we cannot. i don't think anybody would be able to predict that, and certainly what we've seen in egypt and also in libya tells you just how challenging this is. we do know what we have there now. we have a brutal dictatorship where people are socially, p
under assad's control. >> good morning, ladies and gentlemen. i am jim marshall. i am pleased that everyone is here today for a very important project. it has been sponsored by the institute of peace. my job is to introduce steve heideman. he is our senior advisor for middle east initials. he is extensively published and has taught at columbia and at the civil society at georgetown university. this project is one that is driven by syrians. with assistance and other kinds of assistance from sister institutions in germany. it is important these kinds of efforts be driven by local populations. things that are handed down from the united states typically don't work all that well. we are very pleased with all of you here. i hope you have lots of questions. steve, if i could turn this over to you. >> thank you very much for opening up this morning. let me add my welcome. we are delighted to see you all here this morning. it is going to be a very interesting conversation about syria and the challenges of managing a post assad transistor. as jim mentioned, this event is the culminatio
to see what a difference one debate has made. also, rare access into the syrian president bashar al assad's inner circle. a one-time insider sits down with cnn, admits covering up crimes and so much more. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> this just coming into "the situation room" as we await our interview with mitt romney, we have brands new poll numbers from one of the most crucial battleground states in the country certainly on the cnn electoral college map, ohio. both presidential candidates will be there today. and look at this. romney's catching up dramatically. president obama's still ahead 51% to 47%. but his four-point lead falls now within the poll's sampling error. the president had a nine-point lead in our most recent poll of polls in ohio, which was completed just before last week's presidential debate in denver. our chief national correspondent john king is joining us from the state capital of columbus right now. john, you're taking a closer look at the new numbers in this ohio poll. what are you seeing? >> reporter: wolf, if you had any doubt the first d
the rebels, no-fly zone like in libya. and get involved on the side of the anti-assad forces. >> yes. everything that we said would happen, if we got involved, is happening because we're not involved. al-qaeda is pouring in to the place. the massacres have increased. iranians and russians have increased their supplies and support of al assad and the tensions in the region are going up. look at syria, turkey, jordan, syria -- >> bill: sure. it's cauldron over there. >> absolutely. >> bill: i wanted to get your opinion on what you would have done had you been president. finally, were you surprised that president obama was so flat in the debate? he wasn't the guy that debated you four years ago. >> well, i think that there is a fundamental change here, bill, and that was in 2008, he didn't have a record to defend. and he's been living in a four-year bubble surrounded by an adoring media. this is the first time that he has really had to respond and he couldn't because he's having to defend a record which is indefensible. and i guess the second thing is that what is probably most impactfu
president bashar al assad to step down due to his crackdown on his own citizens. and there have been a number of incidents between the two countries. last june, syrian antiaircraft defenses shot down a turkish military reconnaissance jet, killing two pilots, both sides disagree on where exactly that incident took place. but the turks did not really fire back. they didn't use force aside from condemning that attack. the syrians accused turkey of arming the rebels that are fighting against bashar al assad's regime. so this is a very tense relationship and there are voices here at turkey calling for more significant retaliation in response to the death of these five turkish citizens. >> how do the turks feel, ivan, when it comes to possible military intervention in syria? >> i think there are a lot of misgivings, brooke. there are a lot of voices here that are afraid that turkey could be dragged into a war with syria. opposition, political parties have spoken out against the government's policy of supporting the syrian opposition and supporting the syrian rebels. they actually accused t
normally, but they don't necessarily support assad. >> do they believe this is going to end, and it's going to end well, or do they believe that this killing will just continue for a long period of time? >> i think people right now believe that it's going to go on, that it's going to continue, that there's no immediate end in sight. they just kind of get on -- they're sort of in the middle class who are less well off and less affected by the battles themselves. they're just trying to get on with their lives, but i think they all know that this ultimately is going to come to just a worsening situation where there's more loss of life. i think what we've seen, for example, in alleppo today with those car bombs that makes it look like the battle is turning into as we saw in iraq, and certainly some of the groups that are getting involved in the fight with -- on the rebel side using tactics that have been borrowed from al qaeda and others. that's why we're beginning to see some of those tactics. >> there are 30,000 people, perhaps more who have been killed over the course of this uprising. talk
because, as you know, the rebels are demanding assad has to leave. >> yeah. >> rose: and they're not willing apparently, to have much political conversations until that happens. >> yeah, but my point is that for the first time an international gathering agreed on a process, an international meeting including russia agreed on a process leading to a transition in syria. my point is that could serve as the basis for an international response through the u.n. security council. you asked me what could i recommend. >> rose: right, right. >> that's what i could recommend. and, of course, if the parties involved did not comply with that binding resolution, it should have some consequences. it's not for me to elaborate on which consequences. but i do believe that the whole international community has a responsibility to prevent what i see as a humanitarian disaster in syria. and it is clearly a violation of international law. but i think seen from a strategic point of view both russia and china should have a self-interest in being so to speak on the right side of history. and i think t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 133 (some duplicates have been removed)